At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages The SMB Voice and Data Collision

You are searching about At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages, today we will share with you article about At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages is useful to you.

The SMB Voice and Data Collision

Life demands that we do more in less time, and the term “multitasking” is everywhere, from the domestic front to the business world. A homemaker may be preparing dinner, talking to a friend on the phone, and doing a load of laundry. A salesperson may be calling a client, researching the company online, and responding to an instant message from the inventory manager to ensure products are available. So it makes sense that a revolution in technology for small and mid-sized businesses revolves around the convergence of voice and data networks.

In my previous life in telecom equipment sales, we were told this integration was coming. I remember some of my colleagues chuckling as our sales manager laid out the premise and thinking privately there was no way it would work. At the same time, Cisco Systems was in a sprint to roll out the first version of their CallManager products, and so the race to the finish line for network-based systems was on.

The old key and PBX telephone systems date back to the middle of the last century, and were the most innovative technologies for the bulk of businesses. From the big glowing button phones of the 50s and 60s to the more sophisticated Private Branch Exchange (PBX) mega-systems that were popular with large enterprises, these analog business telephone systems utilized a cabling infrastructure all their own. Even organizations that had some form of data network were required to keep them completely isolated, and this created two impactful issues.

  1. The additional costs of running two sets of cables to each employee location for use by either network.
  2. The complete differentiation between the operation and maintenance of each network with almost no cross-training.

In large enterprises this created two teams, the telecom team and the computer team with the related costs to employ them both. In small to mid-sized business, instead of employing two sets of technology professionals they employed third-party local and long distance providers which often resulted in massive finger pointing wars when something went wrong.

So maybe it was inevitable that the two networks would head toward an intersection, however major advancements in the underlying technologies were necessary to make it a reality. The result was Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP). The first VoIP-based system was said to be a software-centric system called Vocaltec. This application was designed to run on a home computer much like PC phones are used today. It was called Internet Phone, though it had strict hardware requirements like special sound cards, microphones, and speakers. The Internet Phone application used an old protocol called H.323 instead of using Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) which is more widely used today. There are many who considered Vocaltec to have been the “Skype” of the mid ’90s because the company experienced considerable success as a VoIP provider. However, the Vocaltec solution was fraught with performance issues centered on the lack of sufficient bandwidth.

While Vocaltec proved not to be the best solution, it was indeed a bellwether of what was to come. Even though traditional phone systems were changing, the fact remained that voice and data systems were still operated and maintained separately with extra costs and added infrastructure. As Cisco’s CallManager platform grew and diversified, other manufacturers came into the marketplace with on-premise solutions. Companies such as ShoreTel and industry giant Microsoft entered the fray to mixed success. One of the main problems was that costs were substantially higher than traditional phone systems for small and mid-sized businesses. So while many would have liked the integrated options offered by this new breed of technology, most were unwilling or unable to justify the up-front expenditure and ongoing support costs.

Slowly but surely, this began to diminish. Cisco saw the light and began offering products specifically designed for the SMB space, and some of the old manufacturers who’d resisted the oncoming revolution started to offers solutions as well. One of the largest was Avaya, the twice-renamed hardware manufacturer once part of communications powerhouse AT&T. Their foray into providing “IP enabled” communications systems gave their everyday competitors the push to follow suit. Soon there was a glut of traditional PBX manufacturers touting their “IP systems.”

In truth, these products were no more than window dressing, and in many cases they still operated on their own infrastructure and still required a relationship with the telecom hardware provider to handle maintenance and moves/adds/changes. With each call to the vendor for service came the service call charge (a.k.a. truck roll charge) plus the hourly rate charge.

During this period a third option arose which eroded a little market share from each of the other two. Hosted VoIP combined the benefits of a network-based asset with the savings of a shared infrastructure, the flexibility of mobile and remote usage, and the security benefits of inherent disaster recovery and prevention. While the other two relied primarily on hardware and software based on-site at the customer server room or data area, Hosted VoIP provided companies the call processing of a massively complex and redundant super switch at a remote hardened data center. There would no longer be a need to have the main phone hardware on-site as it would be accessible from anywhere. Workers connected over a secure Internet tunnel and had access to their phone on their desk in the office, at home connected to an Internet router, or even through a software-based application on their laptop. Even in the event of a failure at the company office, the phones would continue to be answered at the call processing point, and messages would still be delivered. The downside? The organization would be reliant on the continued existence of the provider of the services, because if the VoIP host were to go out of business (and more than a few have) suddenly the customer would be sitting with a bunch of phones and nothing to run them.

So now that we are aware of three different methods of creating a telecom solution that leverages the data network, the question becomes “Why should I do that”? According to most surveys and studies, it’s not a matter of why but when. Are there organizations that can get by with the old-style TDM technology? Without question, but for most small and mid-sized businesses the advantages brought by the integration of voice and data in the network can be significant.

The fear is that this significant improvement also comes with a hefty price tag. This surely was the case in the late 90s and early 2000s, as the data-centric manufacturers struggled with how to price it competitively. On the enterprise level it almost didn’t matter, as those organizations could justify the costs with the productivity enhancements and reductions in cable plant and services. As is usually the case, the SMB throng operates in a much different silo, and costs were a major consideration. As the marketplace adjusted, the feature sets became more within fiscal reach and therefore increased in the desirability factor.

Going beyond the shared cabling, network infrastructure, and the bond between voice and data created a new world of synergies commonly called “unified communications.” In brief, because the concept of unified communications can be fully fleshed out in another article, UC is pretty much what it sounds like.

Elements of unified communications allow previously disparate forms of communications to be merged and managed in one platform. So when you get a voice mail, it is delivered to your email as an attachment. When you get a fax, it is delivered to your email as a PDF file. When you want to see the status of a co-worker, you use “presence” features that give you a dashboard and indicators to show what they are doing. You can initiate an instant message conversation with someone who’s available, and transition it to a phone call or a video call. This just scratches the surface of what can and is being done in the marketplace of UC today, in both the SMB and enterprise flavors.

UC is not the end-all, be-all for what these new systems can do. There are also applications to consider.

  • Click and dial from email or web browsers.
  • Network multiple locations in one seamless entity for internal calling and transferring.
  • “Find me, follow me” call forwarding that delivers calls to wherever the end-user specifies.
  • Text-to-Speech conversion of text messages or Speech-to-Text conversion of voice mail messages.
  • PC-based receptionist call handling.
  • Tightly integrated call centers with calls handled by agents in one or many locations, distributed by time, skill sets, etc.
  • The ability to use cell phones in the on-premises wireless network to easily transition from a cellular call to a business network call.

As you can see, there are myriad of reasons to look in the direction of merging voice and data, but it is important to ask the right questions and among them should be the following.

  1. What is your business size specifically as it relates to the number of employees currently using the phone now? In two years? In five years?
  2. What is the current status of the data network and related systems? Are they robust enough to deal with the extra demands of VoIP? Is there a need to install something completely new or perform a minor upgrade?
  3. What are the most important features the phone system needs to have, no matter the cost or time to implement? What are the key components and abilities that must be considered for the current health and future growth of the business?

This is a small portion of considerations you should have when embarking on the road to convergence, because once you’ve driven a car on the Autobahn, it’s hard to imagine driving your aunt’s van in the school parking lot! Get your business headed in the direction of combined voice and data. Once the initial trepidation has passed, you’ll be on the lookout for a nice straight patch of road to really open her up. Enjoy the ride!

Video about At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages

You can see more content about At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages

If you have any questions about At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 7049
Views: 94365922

Search keywords At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages

At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages
way At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages
tutorial At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages
At&T Has Associated The Wrong Phone Number For My Messages free
#SMB #Voice #Data #Collision

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?The-SMB-Voice-and-Data-Collision&id=6241922

Related Posts

default-image-feature

At&T Go Phone Website Wont Let Me Make A Payment Improve Your Emotional Intelligence Today!

You are searching about At&T Go Phone Website Wont Let Me Make A Payment, today we will share with you article about At&T Go Phone Website Wont…

default-image-feature

At&T Check To See If Phone Is Compatible With Network Understanding The Basic Features Of Collocation Centers

You are searching about At&T Check To See If Phone Is Compatible With Network, today we will share with you article about At&T Check To See If…

default-image-feature

At&T Can You Pay For A New Phone With Insurance Caribbean Charter: Hints for Carefree Smooth Sailing

You are searching about At&T Can You Pay For A New Phone With Insurance, today we will share with you article about At&T Can You Pay For…

default-image-feature

At&T Can You Add A Phone To You Plan Online Video Games Suppliers – Competition Will Do More Good For You!

You are searching about At&T Can You Add A Phone To You Plan Online, today we will share with you article about At&T Can You Add A…

default-image-feature

At&T Can I Get A Plan Without Buying A Phone Building the Dream Home

You are searching about At&T Can I Get A Plan Without Buying A Phone, today we will share with you article about At&T Can I Get A…

default-image-feature

Are Zebra Cell Phone Good.And How.Much To They Cost Recession-Proof Your Business

You are searching about Are Zebra Cell Phone Good.And How.Much To They Cost, today we will share with you article about Are Zebra Cell Phone Good.And How.Much…